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DIY Hose Holder with Pallet Wood Planter

Build a unique hose holder using recycled pallet wood! This wooden holder has a special feature; you can plant your favorite flowers on top. I love it!

Build a unique hose holder using recycled pallet wood! This holder has a special feature; you can plant your favorite flowers on top. I love it!

Have you ever seen that incredible shrinking hose on late night television commercials? I’ve got a news flash for you . . . they don’t work.

We thought we’d found the answer to our problems and could get rid of our hose holder but alas, it wasn’t to be. So instead of coming up with ways to get rid of our hose holder, we decided instead to build our own.

Yes – we embraced the idea of a hose caddy. But we also decided we could make it prettier than a regular hose caddy, and that we could make it out of pallet wood. Which after this table and this art, we had copious amounts of laying around.

Turns out we weren’t the first people to come up with this idea – we found this version and this version online. As any good DIYer does, they make their own version that works for them, and that’s exactly what we did! It’s perfect for holding a hose, and when it’s not in use, it looks so pretty.

Build a unique hose holder using recycled pallet wood! This holder has a special feature; you can plant your favorite flowers on top. I love it!

As with any project, the supplies and instructions might seem complicated, but they really aren’t. Do a quick read through before you begin.

DIY Hose Storage with a Planter Box

Gather Your Supplies

  • Pallets – 1 or 2 depending on wood quality from each pallet
  • 2 x 2s – 16 feet, or two 8 foot pieces
  • 16 – 1 5/8″ wood screws
  • Titebond III Ultimate wood glue
  • Thompson’s water seal
  • Galvanized hinges
  • Small door latch
  • L-brackets brackets with screws – 4
  • Right angle brackets with screws – 8
  • Hardware cloth – 2′ x 5′ roll
  • Landscaping fabric
  • Wood screws, 1/2″ – 32
  • Wood screws, 2″ – 24 to 30
  • Metal handle
  • Everbilt heavy-duty pads, 1″ – 4

Tools

CUT LIST

Pallet Wood (all planed)

  • 24 pieces (various widths x 17″L x .5″ thick)
  • 8 pieces (1.25”W x 20”L x .5” thick)
  • 8 pieces (1.25”W x 15.5”L x .5” thick)
  • 1 piece (4”W x 18.25”L x .5” thick)
  • 2 pieces (24”L x 2.5”W x .5” thick)
  • 2 pieces (22”L x 2.5”W x .5” thick)

2x2s

  • 4 pieces – 15″ long
  • 4 pieces – 17.5″ long
  • 4 pieces – 15.5” long
IMG_1337

Gather your pallet wood. If you need to learn how to dismantle a pallet, check out this video. Using a planer, plane your pallet wood planks to a uniform thickness; approximately 1/2″.

IMPORTANT NOTE: after you plane the wood, we highly recommend letting it sit in a dry environment for a few weeks to dry. The wood WILL shrink (we learned from experience)!

IMG_1338

Use a miter saw to cut your planed pallet planks to 17” lengths. Lay them out – they will be varying widths, which is fine.

The goal is to form four 17” x 20” panels as you see above (you may have to cut the widths of some of your planks to accomplish this). Do not attach anything yet.

IMG_1339

Now you’ll make cross pieces for the top and bottom. Use a miter saw to cut some of your remaining pallet wood into your top and bottom panel trim pieces (1.25”W x 20”L x .5”T). You’ll need eight pieces total.

IMG_1341

Now you’ll finish out the frame for each panel with additional side trim pieces. Use a miter saw to cut additional pallet wood your side panel trim pieces (1.25”W x 15.5”L x .5”T) – you’ll need eight pieces.

You’ll attach everything in the next step.

Glue panels

Assemble all four frames with the wood pieces. Do this by laying out one frame face down as shown on the upper left. Add your wood glue around the exterior, then place the pallet wood pieces face down on top to secure. Complete one panel and then finish the other three.

Bostitch nail gun

Use a nail gun to reinforce the panels you just glued. We did this right away after gluing – no need to let dry. Use 3/4″ nails.

Let your external panel pieces dry. Now you’re going to work on the internal frame of the hose holder.

IMG_1347

Now start cutting your internal frame pieces using 2x2s and a miter saw. Cut four pieces 15″ long, four pieces 17.5″ long, and four pieces 15.5″ long. Your hose holder is going to be deeper than it is wide!

Assemble the longer SIDES first . . . using a Kreg jig.

Kreg jig

Grab two 15″ pieces and two 17.5″ pieces to start. Use a Kreg Jig to drill angled pilot holes on the inside back of the horizontal pieces for attaching screws. Use the instructions included with the Kreg Jig to screw your side frames together. This visual should help:

IMG_1352

You’ll make two of these above. THEN you’ll use the four 15.5″ pieces to attach the two frames, repeating the Kreg Jig instructions. Your final frame will look like this:

Final frame

This is your “skeleton” for the panels and the planter box on the top.

IMG_1354

On the front side of the planter, there is a piece behind the door. You’ll see how it attaches later, but for now, use your miter saw to cut a piece of planed pallet wood to 4”Wx18.25”Lx.5”T.

IMG_1355

Now cut the top frame that will go around the planter box area. Use a miter saw to cut four pieces of planed pallet wood: two pieces 24”L x 2.5”W x .5” thick and two pieces 22”L x 2.5”W x .5” thick. Cut a 45º angle at each end.

hose caddy staining

Before assembly, stain all your components. At least that’s what we did, because it was very easy to do it that way. Follow the instructions on your stain container for best application. Let dry.

Then start assembling your hose caddy!

Hose caddy assemble side panels

Decide which side is the front. On the other three sides, glue the panels on and then screw in with 2″ wood screws. Let the wood glue dry.

Gluing in front panel

On the front, glue in your panel.

IMG_1362

Add a little nail gun action to the sides to secure. Let dry.

Attaching hinges

Attach the hinges to the last panel. Attach these hinges to the hose holder.

Hose caddy closure

Attach the female part of the door latch to the top of the door opening in the center. Attach the male part of the door latch to the corresponding spot on the inside of the front door. Attempt opening and closing before securing down completely!

IMG_1396

Attach a handle to the front of the door.

L brackets hose caddy

Secure the remaining pieces of wood together with your four L-brackets (packets come with screws).

Right angle brackets hose caddy

Attach eight right angle brackets (two on each side) to the panels of your hose caddy as shown above on the left (brackets come with screws).

Flip the entire holder over and center it on the frame held together by L-brackets. Screw the right angle brackets into that top frame. Our packets came with screws and those were the ones we used.

IMG_1402
Mesh hardware cloth

Cut two pieces of ¼” mesh hardware cloth into 18.25” x 20” sheets. Cut 2” out of all of the corners of one piece – this will be the inside bottom. The uncut piece will be the inside top.

Hardware cloth installation

Take the piece of hardware cloth with the corners cut and place it in the inside bottom. Use ½” wood screws to attach it. Do the same with the uncut piece on the inside top.

Doorknob hole

Use a doorknob hole jig to drill out a hole in the center of the lower back panel; this is where the hose will come through.

Feet to bottom hose caddy

On the bottom of the feet, use heavy duty plastic foot pads if it is going to sit on a driveway or other paved surface. It will also keep the feet from sitting directly in water.

Landscaping cloth hose caddy

Take landscaping cloth, cut it, and staple it on top of the top piece of hardware cloth. Use two layers and be sure to cover the sides as well.

Build a unique hose holder using recycled pallet wood! This holder has a special feature; you can plant your favorite flowers on top. I love it!

Plant your plants! I didn’t include those supplies in the list because what you plant is up to you.

Build a unique hose holder using recycled pallet wood! This holder has a special feature; you can plant your favorite flowers on top. I love it!

Isn’t it wonderful? Here’s the back.

We are so happy with it! See the hose holder in motion here:

hose holder in action
Yield: 1 holder

Hose Holder

Build a unique hose holder using recycled pallet wood! This holder has a special feature; you can plant your favorite flowers on top. I love it!

Learn how to make a DIY hose holder out of pallet wood! This is unique because it has a planter box on top.

Prep Time 2 hours
Active Time 8 hours
Total Time 10 hours
Difficulty Intermediate
Estimated Cost $15

Materials

  • Pallets - 1 or 2
  • 2 x 2s - 16 feet, or two 8 foot pieces
  • 16 - 1 5/8" wood screws
  • Titebond III Ultimate wood glue
  • Thompson's water seal
  • Galvanized hinges
  • Small door latch
  • L-brackets brackets with screws - 4
  • Right angle brackets with screws - 8
  • Hardware cloth - 2' x 5' roll
  • Landscaping fabric
  • Wood screws, 1/2" - 32
  • Wood screws, 2" - 24 to 30
  • Metal handle
  • Everbilt heavy-duty pads, 1" - 4

Tools

  • Miter saw
  • Planer
  • Kreg Jig
  • Bostitch nail gun with 3/4" nails
  • Tin snips or wire cutters
  • Drill with doorknob attachment and screw bits
  • Staple gun
  • Scissors

Instructions

  1. Gather your pallet wood. Using a planer, plane your pallet wood planks to a uniform thickness; approximately 1/2".
  2. Use a miter saw to cut your planed pallet planks to 17” lengths. Lay them out - they will be varying widths, which is fine. The goal is to form four 17” x 20” panels with the planks. Do not attach anything yet.
  3. Make cross pieces for the top and bottom. Use a miter saw to cut some of the remaining pallet wood into the top and bottom panel trim pieces (1.25”W x 20”L x .5”T). You’ll need eight pieces total.
  4. Finish out the frame for each panel with additional side trim pieces. Use a miter saw to cut additional pallet wood your side panel trim pieces (1.25”W x 15.5”L x .5”T) - you’ll need eight pieces.
  5. Assemble all four frames with the wood pieces. Do this by laying out one frame face down as shown on the upper left. Add wood glue around the exterior, then place the pallet wood pieces face down on top to secure. Complete one panel and then finish the other three.
  6. Use a nail gun to reinforce the panels you just glued. Use 3/4" nails. Let the external panel pieces dry.
  7. Start cutting the internal frame pieces using 2x2s and a miter saw. Cut four pieces 15" long, four pieces 17.5" long, and four pieces 15.5" long.
  8. Grab two 15" pieces and two 17.5" pieces to start assembling the sides. Use a Kreg Jig to drill angled pilot holes on the inside back of the horizontal pieces for attaching screws.
  9. Make two of these. THEN use the four 15.5" pieces to attach the two frames, repeating the Kreg Jig instructions. This is the "skeleton" for the panels and the planter box on the top.
  10. On the front side of the planter, there is a piece behind the door. For now, use the miter saw to cut a piece of planed pallet wood to 4”Wx18.25”Lx.5”T.
  11. Cut the top frame that will go around the planter box area. Use a miter saw to cut four pieces of planed pallet wood: two pieces 24”L x 2.5”W x .5” thick and two pieces 22”L x 2.5”W x .5” thick. Cut a 45º angle at each end.
  12. Before assembly, stain all your components. Follow the instructions on your stain container for best application. Let dry.
  13. Start assembling the caddy. Decide which side is the front. On the other three sides, glue the panels on and then screw in with 2" wood screws. Let the wood glue dry.
  14. On the front, glue in the panel. Secure with nails and let dry.
  15. Attach the hinges to the last panel. Attach these hinges to the hose holder.
  16. Attach the female part of the door latch to the top of the door opening in the center. Attach the male part of the door latch to the corresponding spot on the inside of the front door. Attempt opening and closing before securing down completely.`
  17. Attach a handle to the front of the door. Secure the remaining pieces of wood together with your four L-brackets (packets come with screws).
  18. Attach eight right angle brackets (two on each side) to the panels of your hose caddy as shown above on the left (brackets come with screws).
  19. Flip the entire holder over and center it on the frame held together by L-brackets. Screw the right angle brackets into that top frame.
  20. Cut two pieces of ¼” mesh hardware cloth into 18.25” x 20” sheets. Cut 2” out of all of the corners of one piece - this will be the inside bottom. The uncut piece will be the inside top.
  21. Take the piece of hardware cloth with the corners cut and place it in the inside bottom. Use ½” wood screws to attach it. Do the same with the uncut piece on the inside top.
  22. Use a doorknob hole jig to drill out a hole in the center of the lower back panel; this is where the hose will come through.
  23. On the bottom of the feet, use heavy duty plastic foot pads if it is going to sit on a driveway or other paved surface. It will also keep the feet from sitting directly in water.
  24. Take landscaping cloth, cut it, and staple it on top of the top piece of hardware cloth. Use two layers and be sure to cover the sides as well. The top is ready for planting.

Notes

CUT LIST

Pallet Wood (all planed)

  • 24 pieces (various widths x 17"L x .5" thick)
  • 8 pieces (1.25”W x 20”L x .5” thick)
  • 8 pieces (1.25”W x 15.5”L x .5” thick)
  • 1 piece (4”W x 18.25”L x .5” thick)
  • 2 pieces (24”L x 2.5”W x .5” thick)
  • 2 pieces (22”L x 2.5”W x .5” thick)

2x2s

  • 4 pieces - 15" long
  • 4 pieces - 17.5" long
  • 4 pieces - 15.5” long

Did you make this project?

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Roni Suzuki

Wednesday 14th of November 2018

Loved these plans ! Just finished one except I used a block of cherry and mahogany that weren’t being used. Didn’t stain it, but did put several coats of outdoor poly. Plans were easy to follow, except for that one measurement that was off and posted by David earlier. ? Definitely for an intermediate or higher wood worker. All of our kids have asked for one now ????

Half Hour Hank

Tuesday 10th of July 2018

Adding it to the list! Great project

Brittany Hurtado

Tuesday 26th of June 2018

Great design! I have plans on making it slightly taller and adding a crank system to it. I'll post it on here when I finish it.

Amy

Tuesday 26th of June 2018

Brittany I can't wait to see it! Yes, please share.

Andrew | Simply Home Tips

Tuesday 17th of April 2018

It's so pretty Amy! Will try to make one someday. Love it.

David

Thursday 23rd of February 2017

The trim boards that are 1.25" X 15.5" are too long. It should be 14.5". 1.25" + 1.25" + 14.5" = 17" I could be wrong but that is what I see, Thanks